Cornbread Thinks: Tack & Tact

“Tack” is all our leather goods for horses, mostly bridles and saddles. Stuff you keep in a “tack room.” That half pint of whiskey hidden on a rafter is not tack, though. “Tact” is the skill of saying what needs to be said, when it needs to be, by the person who should, to the person who needs to hear it – without malice and hurt. You can never have too much of either.

Cornbread Thinks: Starting

Your 2-year-old should already be under a saddle. Buttermilk’s is with Dan Edwards. He worked for Sean Flynn last before opening his own barn. He started Piper and Squiggles, who’ve earned $185,000 between them. So why not use him to start Fort Worth Skeet Club, aka Q-Tip? I called him in August and he was booked! I felt like the parent who got two pink bars and failed to call schools for a Pre-K slot. Emergency! I appealed to a higher power, R.L. Chartier, to save my marriage. Got ’er done.

Cornbread Thinks: Breed ’em all…

The new pony continues to be an emerging dream. Robbie Boyce showed her in the National Cutting Horse Association (NCHA) Futurity Open, missed the semis by a half-point but made the John Deere Open finals. Needed more cow, but no penalties. They finished 11th for 3,900 some odd dollars. Earning her Certificate of Ability, she is now an official cutting horse.

Cornbread Thinks: Remount

Last month I talked about shopping for a new horse. It looks like my patience paid off; R.L. Chartier found me a pony that fits. She was with another trainer and will stay there for now.

blane-schvaneveldt

Frankly Speaking: So, You Call Yourself a Horseman

blane-schvaneveldtBlane Schvanveldt is a legend in the Quarter Horse industry. The late trainer was a horseman who believed a horse could only reach its true potential if you tried to “kill him with kindness.”“Horseman.” This term, in my opinion, describes a person who understands and respects horses. He or she is completely comfortable handling, riding, teaching, interpreting, using and caring for the needs of a horse. This person navigates him or herself around the equine species with an aura of confidence and respect for the animal. A true horseman never has to characterize him or herself as such; that quality is immediately evident and recognizable to anyone who knows what it takes to be one. A horseman commands respect from his or her peers by action, accomplishment and knowledge, which places this person in a unique strata – apart from the general crowd in the horse world. Simply put, he or she stands out and apart from the rest.

Problem is, there are too few horsemen in the equine industry today. Many call themselves horsemen, but few actually grasp and express the concept, and even fewer possess the work ethic required to reach that plateau.

Cornbread Thinks: A New Horse

Squiggles is 6. We have won close to $20,000. It is mostly my fault it isn’t more. Buttermilk and I show aged events, so I need a 3-year-old. We raised him and his half-sister Piper, who aged out last year and is now bred. We are raising yearling and weanling relatives. There is a gap in our “raise them yourself” pipeline. I hate shopping for anything, but especially horses, and in particular unproven ones. It’s a gamble. Buttermilk’s poker-playing friends have asked me why I don’t play poker, too. “Don’t I like gambling?” I do like gambling, but I saddle my bets.

Cornbread Thinks: Politics & Us

I generally dislike politics and politicians. There is no escaping them though. If you don’t pay attention to them, “they” don’t pay attention to you. For a fee, you can hire someone to do this for you. These people are called lobbyists. Some have titles that belie what they do, i.e. executive director of a non-profit trade organization. They still must register as a lobbyist. It is no job for an amateur. Or idealist. Or anyone who sees things in white and black.

Cornbread Thinks: Selling is not Showing

My favoritest thing to do in Fort Worth, Texas, is turn cattle in a sale for horses under saddle. Candy and Jeremy Barwick are gracious enough to humor me in this adventure. I work cheap.

Cornbread Thinks: Went to Convention

The National Cutting Horse Association (NCHA) Convention happened in June in Grapevine, Texas, the home city for DFW Airport and a “ring city” to Fort Worth and Dallas. Fort Worth is the “FW” in the “DFW Metroplex.” The census people are currently without a good definition for exactly what the DFW Metroplex encompasses. The official area number is 7 million souls. Operating on the “what touches mine” theory, the number is close to 8 million, which is a manure load of people. We live in an unincorporated area of Tarrant County, with a Fort Worth address. It was an hour drive to the convention. We stayed at the hotel. Short story, we live here and had to travel.

Cornbread Thinks: What People Do

We moved to a new place a while back. I was waiting on the old place to close before I built my new shop. I crammed as much as I could into the existing three-stall barn. Since I own every tool known to man, it looked like 30 pounds of manure in a 10-pound sack. Then the rains came. And came. I have been running around like a head with my chicken cut off trying to get organized enough to function. So, when the nice, hysterical lady called with a horse down, hung up in the wire fence and bleeding, it was a welcome break. It was also an opportunity I badly needed. I’ll get to that later.