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Tack Talk

How to Hold the 2 Rein

Written by Dennis Moreland on .

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Using the 2 Rein, also called Double Rein, is a time proven training method to transition a young horse from a hackamore to straight up in the bridle.

The Beautifully Simple Slot Ear Headstall

Written by Dennis Moreland Tack on .

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Would you like a headstall that’s extremely comfortable for your horse and simple to use? How about one that was designed by one of the best horseman that ever lived? Watch while NCHA Hall of Fame Rider and earner of over 1.4 million dollars Matt Budge of Budge Performance Horses tells us why he uses the Dennis Moreland Tack Doubled and Stitched Slot Ear Headstall http://bit.ly/1nxhWlY on all his horses.

The Secret to Using a Chuck Frazier Sidepull

Written by Dennis Moreland Tack on .

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The 2017 NRCHA World’s Greatest Horseman Reserve Champion Luke Jones, of Luke Jones Performance Horses, uses the Chuck Frazier Sidepull http://bit.ly/2lKJ7fg in all aspects of his cow horse training program. The Chuck Frazier is similar to other sidepulls, like those we start our colts in. But in addition to the noseband it’s designed with shanks, a curb and a bit hobble.

Don’t Break A Leg! Halter and Lead Safety Tips

Written by Dennis Moreland Tack on .

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We’ve all saddled a horse while it’s tied to the inside of an arena or to a fence or trailer. But have you ever seen halters hanging from the inside of an arena, still tied to the wall, while riders are working their horses in the same arena? Have you ever seen halters and leads in a pile on the ground with people walking or riding around them? These practices can lead to serious accidents. Putting halters and leads outside the arena (or any area where you’re riding) is extremely easy to do and could keep you, your friends and your horses from having an accident.

O Rings, Eggbutts, Offset Ds: Which 1 Is Right For Me?

Written by Dennis Moreland Tack on .

A Look at Snaffle Types with Dennis Moreland Tack

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A snaffle bit is defined as a bit that works without leverage. It is most commonly made with a jointed (or broken) mouthpiece. Three common types of snaffles http://bit.ly/snaffles used in western training are the D Ring (A), the Eggbutt (B) and the O Ring (C). It’s easy to think all 3 of these snaffles work in the same way if they have the same mouthpiece but when we break it down they actually have very different actions. If we take a closer look we can see where each one might help a colt learn to respond to the pull better than another as training progresses.

What You Need to Know About the Mecate

Written by Dennis Moreland Tack on .

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A mecate http://bit.ly/mecates is a rein made of a single piece of rope, usually twisted horse hair or nylon. It is used on hackamores (bosals) and snaffles and is attached in a specific manner to each. The knot used to attach the mecate to a hackamore is also used to adjust the size of the hackamore noseband by taking more or less wraps of the mecate around the base of the noseband just in front of the heel knot. Mecates are attached to snaffle bits with slobber straps http://bit.ly/slobberstraps.

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