mowing

Piles of Grass Clippings Are No Treat for Your Horse

mowing

Are you tempted to cut your grass, then rake it into soft, fragrant, tasty piles of clippings for your horse to nibble? According to equine nutrition expert Dr. Juliet Getty, this should be the last thing you encourage your horse to eat. It has to do with that extra step: raking.

ManchesterTerrier

The Mischievous Puppy

ManchesterTerrierThe guilty.One of the fun parts of working for Quarter Horse News is getting to hear from our readers. Some of you call with questions or comments about something you saw in the magazine, and sometimes, you call looking for help. Sales Customer Service Manager Diana Buettner recently received an email from a subscriber who had an unusual request.

Common Knowledge?

In another life, I would have been a veterinarian. Ever since I was a horse-crazy little girl, I wanted to be a vet. It was a dream I kept through middle school, through high school and into my college years. It wasn’t until my second year in college, the year I first took the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), that I began to doubt my intended career path. That was when I finally admitted that, while I was an average science student, it was not my forte. Veterinary school, I realized, would be more difficult because of it. While I was ready to tackle the book work, there was another reason for my doubts.

Finding Common Ground

stacy-pigott-little-rocket-andyMy first horse, Little Rocket AndyLast month, I had the pleasure of attending the 2013 AQHA Convention in Houston, Texas. This isn’t the first year I’ve been to the convention, but it is the first year I was able to stay for its entirety – from the opening comments to the closing remarks, and everything in between.

My favorite part of the convention had to be Friday afternoon’s forum, which was dedicated to equine welfare. Dr. Tom Lenz, of Zoetis (formerly Pfizer Animal Health), gave a presentation on the science and emotion of equine welfare. I wish it were possible to put his entire presentation in print form, so all of you could read what he had to say. 

Be Heard

On March 5, during the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA) Convention, I posted a question on the Quarter Horse News Facebook page, asking: “Would you support mandatory five-panel genetic testing in order to register an American Quarter Horse?” I posed the question because, the day prior, I sat in on a meeting of the AQHA’s Stud Book and Registration Committee. Topics on the agenda included three proposed rule amendments relating to genetic testing and AQHA registration. The first proposal was to make the genetic panel test mandatory for all future registrations; require placement of the genetic panel test results on the registration certificate; and waive testing of offspring of parents who are N/N for all genetic diseases on the genetic panel test. The other two proposals more specifically singled out the genetic disease heredity equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA) and descendants of the stallion Poco Bueno.
SPigott

Consider The Facts

SPigottQHN Editor Stacy PigottFor the past couple of years, my full-time job has been in the Quarter Horse racing industry. To be a magazine editor, you have to immerse yourself in the industry on which you are reporting, getting down to the nitty gritty. During those years, my role in the Western performance horse industry was relegated to that of casual observer, rather than active participant.

That all changed when I came to Quarter Horse News. My interest in Quarter Horse racing now takes a backseat to the Western disciplines of cutting, reining and reined cow horse. My primary goal over the past month has been to bone up on what has taken place in the last few years with regards to those industries.